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The North and South Wales Bank

This pub still has some of the original bank features.

14 High Street, Wrexham, LL13 8HP

The building now housing this Wetherspoon pub occupies a site bought in 1905 for the North & South Wales Bank, better known as the Wales Bank. Before the present building was completed, the Wales Bank had become part of the Midland Bank (now HSBC).

A print and text about the history of this building.

The text reads: The building now housing this Wetherspoon pub occupies a site bought in 1905 for the North & South Wales Bank, better known as Wales Bank. Before the present building was completed, the Wales Bank had become part of the Midland Bank (now HSBC).

The North & South Wales Bank was set up in Liverpool, in 1836. In the same year a Wrexham branch opened in Mr Griffith’s house and shop in the Market Place. The bank later used the ground floor of the building opposite here, then owned by the Alliance Assurance Company, whose named can still be seen on the façade.

The Alliance building had replaced old timber framed structures, thought to be those in the foreground of a painting by the celebrated artist JMW Turner.

The aspect of Wrexham Church tower shown in the painting suggests that Turner may have made his original sketch from a window of the building formerly on this site. This is possible as the building in question was one of the town’s most important inns, known from the late 17th century as the Red Lion. Once owned by the Myddletons of Chirk Castle, the Red Lion boasted a “find massive oak staircase”, and was probably one of those buildings described as “highly commendable” by the eminent literary figure Dr Samuel Johnson.

Above: The same view in 1910, with this building on the right.

Original bank features can still be found in the pub today, including this safe deposit box.

External photograph of the building – main entrance.


If you have information on the history of this pub, then we’d like you to share it with us. Please e-mail all information to: pubhistories@jdwetherspoon.co.uk