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The Saxon Shore

Take a look at old pictures of Herne Bay.

78–80 Central Parade, Herne Bay, Kent, CT6 5JQ

The southeast coastline of England was once known as the Saxon shore, from the military forts built along it during the late Roman occupation. Today, the Saxon shore footpath passes along central parade and has given its name to this Wetherspoon pub.

A print of the Clock Tower: mustering point for the guard of honour during a royal visit in 1907.



A print of a pier diver.

Pier divers were a popular form of entertainment on the pier. One such was “Professor” Powsey of the 1880s and in the 1930s a Miss Gladys Powsey (thought to be no relation) gave displays of “trick swimming and diving”, at the end of the pier each morning and afternoon.

A print of Tower Gardens.

These premises, now known as The Saxon Shore were previously known as the Tower Hotel. The steeply pitched roof has since been demolished. (Date unknown).

A print of Herne Bay Casino.

In 1925 the complex also included a winter garden and ballroom. Concert seats were 2s 4d (12p) and a dinner-dance cost 7s 6d (37p).

A print of St George’s Terrace and the Royal Pier Hotel viewed from the pier, c1860.



A print of the Chez Laurie.

A popular dancing and dining venue between the wars, on Thanet Way, shows the typical style of the modernist movement.

An illustration of Reculver Church in 1809.

Note the quaint use of birds as notation indicators.

A print of the New Pier Pavilion opened in 1910 at a cost of £4243.



A print of The Ship Hotel, Herne Bay.


Trading vessels once tied up along the stretch of beach.

A print of the Duchess of York.


Built at Whitstable in 1897, ran trips from the beach at the Ship Inn. The boat was owned and run by the Gipsons – a well-known local family.

A print of a busy scene at the ship ramp, Herne Bay beach.



External photograph of the building – main entrance.


If you have information on the history of this pub, then we’d like you to share it with us. Please e-mail all information to: pubhistories@jdwetherspoon.co.uk