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The Smithy Fold

Smithy Fold is now a short passage leading from the Howard Town mill car park.

Unit 11, Howard Town Shopping Park, Victoria Street, Glossop, Derbyshire, SK13 8HS

The bridge which gave Bridge End Mill its name was replaced in 1837 by the new Victoria Bridge (adjacent to this pub). After the new bridge was built, the main road no longer passed along Smithy Fold, but continued up Victoria Street. Smithy Fold is now a short passage, leading from the Howard Town mill car park to the High Street.

Photographs and text about Edmund Potter.

The text reads: In 1825, Edmund Potter and his cousin Charles established the printworks in Dinting Vale. They were both 23 years of age.

Edmund introduced printing machines to replace the old hand block printing.

His enterprise was so successful that it became one of the largest calico print works in the world.

Photographs and text about the spinning industry.

The text reads: During the industrial revolution of the 18th century Glossop became a centre for cotton spinning.

Glossop was a town of very large calico mills.

A photograph and text about Arthur Lowe.

The text reads: Arthur Lowe was born in Hayfield 4.5 miles south of Glossop. He was an actor whose career spanned over thirty years. He is best known for playing Captain Mainwaring in the sitcom Dad’s Army.

A photograph and text about Hilary Mantel.

The text reads: Hilary is an English writer who was born in Glossop in 1952. She has twice been awarded the Booker prize.

A print and text about LS Lowry.

The text reads: The Manchester born artist lived at Mottram-in-Longdendale, 5 miles west of Glossop. He died at Woods hospital in Glossop in 1976.

An illustration and text about the Victoria Bridge.


The text reads: The bridge that gave Bridge End Mills its name was replaced in 1837 by the new Victoria Bridge adjacent to this Wetherspoon site. After the new bridge was built the main road no longer passed through Smithy Fold, but continued up Victoria Street. Smithy Fold is now a short passage leading from the Howard Town Mill car park and is to be redeveloped. This provided the inspiration for the naming of this Wetherspoon establishment.

Text about the history of Glossop.


The text reads: Glossop is thought to have got its name during the 17th century, when Saxon settlers established several farmsteads in the valley. The name Glossop is usually said to mean Glott’s Hop, or valley. Glott was probably a chieftain.

Old photographs of Glossop, including the main Co-op building in 1930.


A photograph and text about Vivienne Westwood.


The text reads: Vivienne Westwood was born in Tintwistle in 1941 and attended Glossop Grammar School. She is largely responsible for bringing punk and new wave fashions into mainstream. 

External photograph of the building – main entrance.


The local history images and engravings used in our artwork have been kindly donated by the Glossop Heritage Trust.

If you have information on the history of this pub, then we’d like you to share it with us. Please e-mail all information to: pubhistories@jdwetherspoon.co.uk